Thursday, 31 August 2017

Over-Optimism of Brexiters Is Ruining This Country

In today's iPaper
One of the first tasks in any negotiation is to understand the other side and what will be a WIN for them.  Then you can aim for a WIN-WIN.

Clearly that has escaped the UK’s negotiation team in the EU negotiations this week.  But today takes the biscuit.

The headline in the iPaper today, similar to many other daily papers, screams “Britain to strike trade deals ‘by replicating EU agreements’” according to Theresa May, our Prime Minister.

I’ve met Theresa one to one for a detailed rather technical discussion.  I can assure you she’s very bright and quick on the uptake.  But this new statement is incredibly na├»ve. Or desperate.

Of course any legal agreement these days starts with a previous one.  Why re-invent the wheel?  But then you have to ask for what the other side would be looking.  Inevitably something better.  Without the size and clout of the EU, the UK cannot expect each final deal to be as good as we have today as members of the EU.  That's either to replace some fifty existing deals, or for new ones.

This over-optimism from Brexiters has been the case right through from before last year’s referendum.  Everything will be “easy”.  Complexities and downside are swept under the carpet.  The enthusiasm is infectious.  The naivety staggering.

It reminds me of something.  Working with new graduates.  For them, anything is possible, and sometimes it’s worth a good try.  But experience shows some aspirations are good, and some things are bad. Theresa May is dressing up wolves in sheep’s clothing.  Making out bad is good.

Yet all the senior people in May’s government are well over 40.  They should know better.  Much better.  They are taking us backwards, at great expense, and thereby ruining this country.  When will any of them see sense?

Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Be Warned. Labour's Announcement Is Not a Soft Brexit

One of the first people I spoke to today was a young man who asked me what I thought about the Labour change in Brexit policy.  Like many, he's deeply concerned about Brexit and wants a second referendum to stop Brexit as soon as possible.  He's not usually a Labour voter, but sees them as a potential salvation. I had to dispel his hopes.  People are being misled.  The situation needs to be explained so everyone understands.

The first thing to note is that official Labour policy is still as set out in the General Election manifesto earlier this year.  It says:


We will scrap the Conservatives’
Brexit White Paper and replace it
with fresh negotiating priorities that
have a strong emphasis on retaining
the benefits of the Single Market
and the Customs Union – which
are essential for maintaining
industries, jobs and businesses in
Britain. Labour will always put jobs
and the economy first.

What it doesn't say is Labour plan to stay in the Single Market and Customs Union.  Official policy is in fact virtually exactly the same as the Conservatives.  A new separate deal with a "have cake and eat it" approach. 

Indeed Labour's leader Jeremy Corbyn has consistently and for a long time been against the EU itself. After last year's referendum, he was one of the first to ask for the immediate serving of the Article 50 notification to withdraw from the EU. So desperate that he wasn't going to give the Government machine any chance to prepare.  Labour had a three line whip in support in the eventual revocation debate.

Make no mistake, Labour's official policy is "Hard Brexit".

So what about Keir Starmer's announcement at the weekend?

Firstly this was only in a newspaper article.  Keir is Labour's "Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union" and the most senior spokesman on Brexit.  [UPDATE] Jeremy Corbyn has now endorsed his announcement, but "Can't say" what will happen after transition period.

Indeed you will find no mention of any policy change if you search on the Labour website.  The last news there on Brexit is a Keir speech in May and a Corbyn speech just before the General Election in June in which he said "We will confirm to the other member states that Britain is leaving the European Union. That issue is not in doubt." and talks about a new partnership "deal".  Just like the manifesto.

So why are esteemed publications such as the Guardian, Independent and Telegraph calling it a "new policy"?  It's 'Fake News' folks.  Let's look at what Keir actually said in his Guardian article

He starts "We need a transitional Brexit deal..." and goes on to say "A credible solution to one of the most important issues facing Britain’s exit from the EU."  He explains that Labour's idea of a transitional period will be different from the Conservatives, saying "a transitional period under Labour will be as short as possible, but as long as is necessary."  

Everything else in his article is consistent with the manifestoIt's still a Hard Brexit.  Only deferred.  It is not a Soft Brexit.  Any reference to a new policy or Soft Brexit is frankly 'Fake News'.

But hang on a minute.  Is it coincidence that a new Labour group was launched at the same time, which Chuka Umunna is promoting?  It calls itself Labour4SingleMarket.orgFirst impressions may be that the Single Market is Labour policy.  But it makes it clear inside that "The Labour Campaign for the Single Market seeks to shift Labour Party policy into one of unequivocal support for staying in the Single Market by remaining a member of the European Economic Area and the Customs Union. We have TWO WEEKS at the beginning of September to get a motion submitted to Labour Party Conference to ensure this is our policy - please do everything you can to help."

However there's no proposal as to how that is to be achieved.  Unlike the Just Party, whose EEAplus HalfBrexit proposal is gathering interest.  The devil's in the detail, but at least we have a starting point that should have strong support in the UK, and solves many of the EU's issues..

Labour gave a misleading impression to youngsters about existing Student Loans in the final days of the General Election, which Corbyn neither endorsed nor denied.  But Labour has since explained this was no more than a hope.  The media reported it as policy. That was the impression I got without having time to delve deeper before the vote.  I spoke at the time to graduates who were duped and voted Labour as a result.  Here we go again on Brexit.

So Labour can't be trusted.  Labour can't be trusted on the economy as Gordon Brown proved, yet official Labour policy now is even further to the left.  Labour can't be trusted on Student Loans.  Labour can't be trusted on the defence of the UK.  Labour can't be trusted on Brexit.  In fact Labour can't be trusted on anything.

If you want a Caring Society, paid for by a Thriving Economy then you need The Just Party.  Just for you!



Friday, 25 August 2017

A Year On, What's Your View On The EU?

Everyone has different views on the EU. What's your answer to these five questions about the EU?





Yes
No
1
Do you want the UK to collaborate economically with our European neighbours?


2
Do you want the UK to collaborate on non-political areas such as Euratom and Open Skies?


3
Do you think MEPs are necessary for the UK?


4
Do you want the UK to adopt the Euro in place of Pound Sterling?


5
Do you want the UK to become a state within the United States of Europe


 
If your answer is "Yes" to all five questions, then you are clearly pro-EU.

If your answer is "No" to all five, then you are the hardest of Brexiters. But most want a trade deal of some kind.

Most people are likely to have a mix of "Yes" and "No".  I would expect most to say "Yes" to questions one and two, but "No" to three four and five. Did you?  Some of these people will have voted Remain, some Leave.  Depends on other factors, such as how they regarded the pain of transition.

It struck me recently that I am not aware of any single issue on which our MEPs have voted. The UK media don't bother to report votes with any prominence, either because the votes are unimportant and/or the UK public isn't interested. In any case power on practical matters appears to be in the European Commission in Brussels.  The actual power structure is set out in this BBC article, a little out of date in detail but still valid in principles.

PROPOSAL

Subject to doing some polling, it looks like the majority of the country would have a mixture of "Yes" and "No" answers, and the majority would support some form of #HalfBrexit.  Here is a specific proposal called the "EEAplus HalfBrexit":
  • The UK would join an upgraded 'EEAplus', being the current European Economic Area upgraded to:
    • Boost the UK's involvement in decisions, and 
    • Add any EU trading aspects not currently covered by the EEA agreements
  • The UK would otherwise leave the EU, including no need for MEPs
  • But the UK would retain collaboration in key non-political pan-European initiatives that do not need the UK to be EU members, such as the Open Skies initiative for air travel
Freedom of Movement (FOM) of People, at least of workers, would need to be retained. Crucially a recent poll  found that the UK electorate put staying in the Single Market with FOM above restricting FOM by over two to one. The proposal arises from that preference.

The EU would need to support the "EEAplus HalfBrexit" idea too.  It solves the problem they have with wanting to protect their business with the UK, whilst not giving the UK benefits without the obligations.  Up to now the UK approach has been "have cake and eat it", which is never going to get the necessary support from the various EU institutions involved.

The proposal would also solve the three key issues in the early part of the negotiations, as well as a number of other benefits:
  1. Irish Border which would continue to be open as at present
  2. Rights of EU27 citizens in UK and Brits in EU27 countries
  3. Settlement of 'divorce bill, covered by new annual contributions

Interested?  A full outline is given here. 




Monday, 21 August 2017

The 'EEAplus Half Brexit' Proposal - Practical Solution With Expected Majority Support

How can the UK collaborate with the EU on economic and important non-political matters whilst otherwise maintaining independence?  Not just now but for the long term?

How can that be done in a way that is supported by the EU, and would achieve support from the majority of the UK electorate? Regardless of general politics?

What is the key to a UK/EU settlement?

One option to consider is the 'EEAplus Half Brexit' proposal.  It does 'what it says on the tin' for the long term:

  • The UK would join an upgraded 'EEAplus', being the current European Economic Area upgraded to:
    • Boost the UK's involvement in decisions, and 
    • Add any EU trading aspects not currently covered by the EEA agreements
  • The UK would otherwise leave the EU, including no need for MEPs
  • But the UK would retain collaboration in key non-political pan-European initiatives that do not need the UK to be EU members, such as the Open Skies initiative for air travel
Freedom of Movement (FOM) of People would need to be retained. Crucially a recent poll  found that the UK electorate put staying in the Single Market with FOM above restricting FOM by over two to one. The proposal arises from that preference.

The key benefits of a 'EEAplus Half Brexit' would be that the trading relationship with the EU would remain unaltered, so no risk of a negative economic impact to the UK from Brexit.  Nor would there be any impact on the EU's trade with the UK.

Furthermore all three key negotiation issues that have stalled would be resolved:

  1. Irish Border which would continue to be open as at present
  2. Rights of EU27 citizens in UK and Brits in EU27 countries
  3. Settlement of 'divorce bill, covered by new annual contributions
 In addition:
  • As a result of no economic impact from Brexit, Sterling would regain much of the 15-20% loss since the referendum.  This would reduce import prices and avoid the unwelcome impact of rising import prices on general inflation
  • The proposal broadly fulfils the objectives of each main political party.  The upgraded EEA may even count as the 'new deal' sought by the ruling Conservatives, though the proposal would probably not provide them with direct trade deals by the UK with other countries
  • An 'EEAplus' could provide an exit route for any country wanting to leave the EU but remain in a trading relationship.  That might include Greece, which currently is in the euro, and Sweden, which like the UK still has its own currency
  • The European Court of Justice (ECJ), which oversees EU matters and is such a hot issue for many, would be replaced for most purposes by the Courts of the EEA, upgraded as necessary. There has to be some way of enforcing the rules of the Single Market, but not those dread letters ECJ..
  • The UK would retain the right to rejoin the EU, though that would probably require adopting the Euro.  (This is another reason not to leave completely now and potentially rejoin for economic purposes later)
Proposals with a similar name have been made before, but this proposal has been crafted separately and is somewhat different. 


WHY SHOULD THE EU ACCEPT SUCH A PROPOSAL?

'EEAplus Half Brexit' solves a number of key economic issues for the EU.  The EU27 countries export a lot of goods to the UK, including German cars, French foods, and Dutch produce.  There's also crucial supply chains that span the English Channel for other manufacturers, plus trade across the Irish border.  The EU27 want to keep that trade.

But the EU and specifically the German car industry has made it clear that they are prepared to sacrifice that trade to avoid the risk of a break-up of the EU.  That would arise if a country leaving the EU 'club' completely were keep equal trading rights whilst avoiding the commitments of club members.  Clearly that would be unacceptable in any club.

The 'EEAplus Half Brexit' idea would avoid crossing two critical EU 'red lines':
  • Maintain Freedom of Movement of People, not just workers
  • Avoid the UK enjoying all the benefits of a trading relationship with the EU without the commitments of EU members
The EU federalist dream of ever-closer political integration to become the United States of Europe can still drive forward with over 20 countries. But not with the UK.

There may need to be some compromise by the EU, but that's negotiation. All the right side of their key red lines.  On balance the EU should accept the 'EEAplus Half Brexit' idea as better for the EU than any other idea involving the UK leaving the EU.


WHY SHOULD THE UK ELECTORATE ACCEPT SUCH A PROPOSAL?

As noted above, a recent poll  found that the UK electorate put staying in the Single Market with FOM above restricting FOM by over two to one.

This is consistent with the analysis in the Footnote below, that suggests views on Brexit follow a Normal Distribution.  That would mean between 60% and 80% of the UK electorate would be expected to support such a proposal.   That's groups B-D in the diagram, plus possibly some of E.

The only people disappointed would be those at either end of the spectrum.  That is those strongly pro-EU in A and the hard Brexiters in F who want to be completely independent of Europe.

A lot of people have said we need to heal the 50:50 divide that still exists in the country between Leave and Remain.  'EEAplus Half Brexit' would do that with a clear majority, in a way that stopping Brexit to keep in the Single Market wouldn't.


THE WAY FORWARD

The UK is currently publishing "Position Papers" on key issues such as today on Future Customs Arrangements.  The likelihood is that these papers will be largely rejected by the EU, crossing the red lines as discussed above.  The danger is that talks will stall completely.

Whilst some people would welcome the UK just walking away from talks, the practicalities are horrendous and cannot realistically be completed by March 2019:
  • Paragraph 13 of the Future Customs Arrangements paper says of the new Government proposal (which would also be required if walking away) "...we will again take up our independent seat at the WTO. ... we will prepare schedules that replicate as far as possible our current obligations..."There are hundreds of such schedules on individual products and will take years of negotiation to separate out specific quantities for the UK
  • The changes to Government and business IT systems will likely take a minimum of three years
The 'EEAplus Half Brexit' idea would avoid all of this, and is a much more practical alternative.

The steps would be
  • EU agree to the proposal in principle by the end of 2017
  • If necessary put the proposal to the UK electorate in a referendum in Spring 2018.  
  • That would give business and government 12 months to make relatively minor tweaks to systems and processes. 
  • Should the referendum alternative require longer, then a longer transition period will be needed

What has changed since the vote in Parliament to invoke Article 50 is that there is now a cross-party APPG, consisting of MPs from all parties including Labour and Conservative, effectively campaigning to stay in the Single Market.  Their support of the 'EEAplus Half Brexit' idea could make all the difference in Parliament as the various Brexit bills are debated. 

IN CONCLUSION

There is enough in the 'EEAplus Half Brexit' proposal to be worthy of serious consideration.  That is especially if there is further deadlock in the UK/EU negotiations.  MPs need to consider whether it is in fact in the country's best interests, given the likely level of public support.


FOOTNOTE: THE SPECTRUM OF VIEWS ON BREXIT

Those who are 'pro-EU' are keen to join the federalist dream of the EU so:
  • Want the UK to become one of the United States of Europe
  • Want the UK to adopt the Euro in place of Pound Sterling
At the other end of the spectrum there are 'Brexiters' who want to have nothing at all to do with the EU, other than some form of free trade deal.

In the middle there is potentially a far larger group who want to collaborate with their European neighbours whilst maintaining a degree of independence.  Greater in number but not so vocal.

Indeed we can split the UK electorate into six groups across the Brexit spectrum.  As the Single Market will inevitably require Free Movement of People, border control is covered by the Single Market: 

Stance
Single Market
Euro-scepticism
REMAIN
A
Pro-EU
Yes
Embrace the EU
B
Pro-EU Lite
Yes
A little scepticism
C
Mildly Remain
Yes
Some scepticism
LEAVE
D
Mildly Leave
Yes
Somewhat more sceptical
E
Clearly Leave
Possibly
Sceptical
F
Brexiter
No
Anti-EU

Group A, as mentioned above, want to embrace the federalist dream of the EU

Group B want to maintain arrangements in the EU as they are, with MEPs but maintaining the Pound.  'Pro-EU Lite' if you like.

Group C does not want to be sucked into the federalist model at some later date.  They want to maintain as much independence for the UK as possible whilst collaborating with our European neighbours.  This is by maintaining the UK's position in the Single Market and other non-political initiatives like Open Skies.  Prepared to otherwise leave the full EU, and prepared to lose MEPs..

Group D are those whose concern about a federalist EU is somewhat stronger, and so on balance voted Leave.  But this was a close decision.  They would still like to stay in the Single Market if possible.

Group E are keener on an independent UK, including control of the UK's borders.  But still are open to remaining in the Single Market if that makes economic sense to them as individuals. 

Group F are the Brexiters who want nothing to do with the EU other than a free trade agreement

Experience of talking to people suggests the six groups are broadly in accordance with a normal distribution:

The two outer groups are vocal, as is the case with most matters. It's the 'silent majority' in the middle that are the most important.  The 'EEAplus Half Brexit' is for them


If you'd like to learn more about The Just Party, click here


 

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Supporting The Just Party

The Just Party has been formed to:
  1.  Fill the political gap in the centre between the LibDems and The Conservatives as they lean increasingly right
  2. Stop Brexit or at least keep the UK in the Single Market, with our innovative proposal #Half Brexit or #Halt Brexit
Representing this diagramatically, the Just Party has 'natural support' from every voter who sees their own position in the light blue rectangle.  The circle for The Just Party is larger than any of the more established parties to represent the number of the electorate in each party's rectangle, as shown in this analysis.

The closest to The Just Party is the LibDems.  But there are some significant differences in position and policies as discussed here.

The Just Party's aims, values and strategy are given here, with the key aims being:
  1. A Thriving Economy
  2. A Caring Society

HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THE JUST PARTY?

Would you place yourself in the light blue rectangle, or close to it?

Would you like to Stop a Hard Brexit and/or see The Just Party on the ballot paper at the next Westminster election?

Then do support us:
  1. With your time, to help spread the word. On Twitter, Facebook and otherwise to your friends.  Especially if you know moderate anti-Brexit MPs and other influential people who would be interested.
  2. Simply make a donation.  Minimum £5 and up to £500 can be made by anyone anywhere in  the world without your name being disclosed.  Your name will not be published without your permission, and you can if you wish remain anonymous.
  3. Anyone making a donation of £24 or more will optionally become an Associate Member of The Just Party.  Details are here. This is even if you are a member of another party. 
Why not?  Do support us today!

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Press Release re Brexit - Irish Border and New Party

The Just Party logo  - "Just Forward"
Two key Brexit topics have hit the headlines in the last few days:
  1. The need for making progress on the three key issues in the first round of the UK/EU negotiations.  This includes how to resolve the Irish border, on which the government published a paper today
  2. The need for a new anti-Brexit political party, as suggested by James Chapman, the former Chief of Staff to David Davis at the Department for Exiting the EU
The Just Party has published two blogposts today addressing these two issues:

"Let's Collaborate Independently"
The spectrum of Brexit support and a proposal arising which solves all three key issues, including Irish border


"A New Anti-Brexit Party - But Which One?"
A look at James Chapman's proposal and the only registered anti-Brexit party, The Just Party
http://bit.ly/JustWhich

The Just Party's founder, Chris Challis, wrote both articles.  He is available for media interviews and opinion pieces.  Relevant media experience includes:
  • Appearance by invitation in interview feature on BBC Sunday Politics South on 25 June 2017, plus other TV and radio appearances
  •  Professional writing for Institute of Chartered Accountants (ICAEW), over 100 articles
  • "Best Speaker" at an Ascot Speakers event in July 2017
Note For Editors:
The Just Party was founded to represent the large number of people as a centrist political party in the gap between the LibDems and increasingly right-wing Conservatives.  The party is anti-Brexit as Brexit undermines the party's two key aims:
  1. A Thriving Economy
  2. A Caring Society
"The Just Party in a Nutshell" sets out a summary of the party's offer to the electorate.

For regulated broadcasters including the BBC, OFCOM encourages you to give a voice to emerging parties.  The guidance section 6.2 says "Broadcasters must also consider giving appropriate coverage to parties ... with significant views and perspectives." We look forward to helping you with your broadcasts.

For newspapers and other media, we hope you will also take the chance to cover the significant views and perspectives in these articles.

Contact with Chris can be made by Twitter direct message @justqcharley

A New Anti-Brexit Party - But Which One?

James Chapman has hit the headlines in recent days proposing a new party to fight Brexit.  As David Davis's former Chief of Staff in the Department for Leaving the EU, he has seen the negotiations with the EU from the inside.  His view is Brexit will be a disaster, despite the most valiant of efforts. His tweets in recent days have been a tirade that has led some who know him to publicly to fear for his health.  Yet the core of the tweets is spot on, including the need for a new anti-Brexit party that is broadly centrist.

The new party he's dubbed "The Democrats" would launch at an event in London on 9 September, between the two days of debate of the first Brexit Bill, dubbed the 'Great Repal Bill' on 7th and 11th.  It is clear that the new party is in its earliest stages.  There would be a long registration process with the Electoral Commission.  The first detail of the party made public, its proposed emblem, would not be acceptable to register as it needs to be square.  The name itself may be too similar to other registered parties to be registered, not least given the Liberal Democrats. It doesn't bode well for the more complicated matters. That new party certainly has got a long way to go before it can field candidates!

Yet a suitable anti-Brexit party already exists.   The Just Party.  It is the only one already registered with the Electoral Commission, and thus the only one currently able to field candidates in elections under the party name. Its foundations are centrist.  The anti-Brexit position has been taken as Brexit risks undermining the Party's two principal aims:
  1. A Thriving Economy
  2. A Caring Society
Its position on the Brexit and Left-Right spectrums compared to the more established parties is as follows.  

The circles are around the epicentre of support for each party, according to 2017 manifestos or websites. The rectangle around the Just Party represents the realistic reach of the party.  An equivalent rectangle could be drawn around each party's circle.  This explains why Labour and Tories have traditionally fought over the floating voters in the centre, who up to now have not had a party like The Just Party representing them directly.

The Just Party circle is bigger than the others to represent a much larger number of people in its rectangle than any of the other parties in their respective rectangles.

This is for two reasons:
  • Position on Left-Right spectrum
  • Position on A-F Brexit spectrum
POSITION ON LEFT-RIGHT SPECTRUM

The Just Party was formed before Brexit, to fill a gap in the political spectrum between centre-left LibDems and the right-wing Conservatives.  ComRes confirmed a few weeks later that the vast majority of the electorate see themselves in The Just Party's precise position, as shown by the lines (top total electorate, bottom actual voters).

So The Just Party naturally represents the vast majority of people in terms of the left-right spectrum.


POSITION ON BREXIT SPECTRUM

Support for Leave and Remain remains around 50:50 according to recent polls.  So let's split the electorate into smaller groups to help understand what is going on:

Stance
Single Market
Euro-scepticism
REMAIN
A
Pro-EU
Yes
Embrace the EU
B
Pro-EU Lite
Yes
A little scepticism
C
Mildly Remain
Yes
Some scepticism
LEAVE
D
Mildly Leave
Yes
Somewhat more sceptical
E
Clearly Leave
Possibly
Sceptical
F
Brexiter
No
Anti-EU

The groups are discussed more fully here, Put together with the experience of talking to people, it would appear that the groups broadly fit into a standard 'normal distribution' curve as follow:
The Just Party is in group C.  Its reach for its policies and initiatives would typically cover groups B, C and D, and therefore up to some 80% of the electorate (12 + 34 + 34).  Certainly a good initiative should command a clear majority of support from the country.

Hence as an alternative to remaining fully in the EU, the proposal for a 'Half Brexit' whereby:
  • The UK joins an upgraded 'EEAplus', being the current European Economic Area upgraded to boost the UK's involvement in decisions, and add any EU trading aspects not currently covered by the EEA agreements
  • The UK otherwise leaves the EU, including no need for MEPs
  • But the UK retains collaboration in key non-political pan-European initiatives that do not need the UK to be EU members, such as the Open Skies initiative for air travel
 The benefits of a 'Half Brexit' include:
  • Solving all three key initial UK/EU negotiation topics that have stalled, including crucially the Irish border issue
  • Removing economic downside of Brexit, thereby helping restore the Pound's strength and thereby reduce inflation deriving from food and other imports
  • Providing a better economic solution for the EU that politically doesn't cross any red lines, so the EU should support the idea
  • Helps to heal the 50:50 divide by being supported by a clear majority of the UK electorate, both the more moderate Remainers and the more moderate Leavers
Please see a more expansive discussion of the proposal for a 'Half Brexit' here


THE WAY FORWARD

The Just Party naturally commands far greater support from the UK electorate than any other established party.  This is due to its position on both the Left-Right and Brexit spectrums.  But converting 'natural support' to actual support at the ballot box is not easy.

The Just Party now needs a celebrity and/or prominent politician to propel the party into the headlines.  One or more of the MPs in the new cross-party APPG perhaps? Ideally MPs from both Labour and Conservative parties.  Do step forward!

You yourself can help if you would like to see these ideas become prominent, and to see The Just Party at the ballot box next election.  That could be sooner rather than later, given Theresa May's slim majority. Do support us now:  

  1. With your time, to help spread the word. On Twitter, Facebook and otherwise to your friends.  Especially if you know moderate anti-Brexit MPs and other influential people who would be interested.
  2. Simply make a donation.  Minimum £5 and up to £500 can be made by anyone anywhere in  the world without your name being disclosed.  Your name will not be published without your permission, but you can if you wish remain anonymous.
  3. Anyone making a donation of £24 or more will optionally become an Associate Member of The Just Party.  Details are here. This is even if you are a member of another party. 
Why  not?  Do support us today!